Hack The Flab #10

Hack the flab from your writing or your readers might shout obscenities in your direction stop reading. Avoid the following 10 examples of flab:

  1. Desirable benefit – Redundant Phrase. You don’t need desirable. Ex: What desirable benefit does writing offer? Better: What benefit does writing offer?
  2. Did not have much confidence in – Avoid using not if possible. Readers don’t like when you tell them what is not. They like when you tell them what is. Use distrusted or doubted. Ex. The soldiers did not have much confidence in their officers. Better: The soldiers doubted their officers’ abilities.
  3. Did not pay attention to – Avoid using not if possible. Readers don’t like when you tell them what is not. They like when you tell them what is. Use ignored. Ex. The soldiers did not listen to their officers. Better: The soldiers ignored their officers’ orders.
  4. Did not remember – Avoid using not if possible. Readers don’t like when you tell them what is not. They like when you tell them what is. Use forgot. Ex. The soldiers did not remember their instructions. Better: The soldiers forgot their instructions.
  5. Different kinds – Redundant Phrase. You don’t need different. Ex: The chart lists five different kinds of animals. Better: The chart lists five kinds of animals.
  6. Due to – Clunky expression. Use because of or because it instead. Ex: He got wet due to the rain. Better: He got wet because of the rain. Best: He got wet because it rained (Fixes nominalization by changing rain from a noun to a verb).
  7. Due to the fact that – Empty phrase. Delete or use because or since. Ex: Due to the fact that I write, I love books. Better: Because I write, I love books.
  8. During the course of – Redundant Phrase. You don’t need the course of. Ex: The forecast will change during the course of the day. Better: The forecast will change during the day.
  9. Dwindle down – Redundant Phrase. You don’t need down. Ex: She loved to shop, so her savings dwindled down. Better: She loved to shop, so her savings dwindled.
  10. Each and every – Redundant Phrase. You don’t need and every. Ex: I loved each and every one of them. Better: I loved each one of them.
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