Hack The Flab #9

Hack the flab from your writing or your readers might shout obscenities in your direction stop reading. Avoid the following 10 examples of flab:

  1. Could possibly – Redundant Phrase. You don’t need possibly. Ex: You could possibly win. Better: You could win.
  2. Crisis situation – Redundant Phrase. You don’t need situation. Ex: Relax and think clearly during a crisis situation. Better: Relax and think clearly during a crisis.
  3. Current trend – Redundant Phrase. You don’t need current. Ex: Some say blogging is a current trend you should avoid. Better: Some say blogging is a trend you should avoid.
  4. Cut down on – Flabby Phrasal Verbs. Use reduce or limit. Ex: You should cut down on your sugar intake. Better: You should limit your sugar intake.
  5. Decision – Nominalization (Wordiness introduced when someone uses the noun equivalent of a verb or adjective). Use the verb or adjective form for more powerful sentences. Ex: He made a decision to quit smoking. Better: He decided to quit smoking.
  6. Decrease in strength – Nominalization (Wordiness introduced when someone uses the noun equivalent of a verb or adjective). Use the verb or adjective form for more powerful sentences. Ex: You’ll decrease in strength if you work out too much. Better: You’ll weaken if you exercise too much.
  7. Definition – Nominalization (Wordiness introduced when someone uses the noun equivalent of a verb or adjective). Use the verb or adjective form for more powerful sentences. Ex: His definition of fun was sleeping and watching television. Better: He defined fun as sleeping and watching television.
  8. Depreciate in value – Redundant Phrase. You don’t need in value. Ex: Assets depreciate in value as each year passes. Better: Assets depreciate as each year passes.
  9. Descend down – Redundant Phrase. You don’t need down. Ex: Descend down the steps to exit the building. Better: Descend the steps to exit the building.
  10. Description – Nominalization (Wordiness introduced when someone uses the noun equivalent of a verb or adjective). Use the verb or adjective form for more powerful sentences. Ex: What’s your description of great writing? Better: How would you describe great writing?
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